Cuba’s Slave Trade in Doctors

By Mary Anastasia O’Grady

Havana earns almost $8 billion a year off the backs of the health workers it sends to poor countries..

Cuban slave-doctors being sold to Argentina for a very high price

By Carlos Eire December 13, 2014 



But now, in Argentina, the situation is very different. By asking for higher pay for Cuban doctors, the Castro regime has found a way to make it seem as if their medical slaves are not really being exploited. Of course, the fact that the high salaries go to the Castro regime rather than to the doctors themselves remains hidden from view. Consequently, the positive publicity this deal will attract is potentially enormous. To top it off, the free foodstuffs being sent to Castrogonia probably make this deal better than that struck with any other nation, save Venezuela, which provides free oil.

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Dumping medicine, faking patients:
​Cuban doctors describe a system that breeds fraud


​BY JIM WYSS January 27, 2017

Lucrative ‘exports’

The quota pressure stems from Cuba’s economics. Desperate for hard currency, the government sends its legions of health workers abroad under contracts that let the administration keep the lion’s share of the revenue.

According to an article published by the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, there were 37,000 Cuban health professionals working in 77 countries during 2015. Citing unnamed Cuban officials, the document claims the health workers generated about $8 billion in foreign exchange revenue for the island that year.
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“You are trained in Cuba and our education is free, health care is free, but at what price?” “You wind up paying for it your whole life.”
-​Dr. Jiménez, 34


Cuban Doctors Revolt: ‘You Get Tired of Being a Slave’

By ERNESTO LONDOÑO  SEPT. 29, 2017
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Thousands of Cuban doctors work abroad under contracts with the Cuban authorities. Countries like Brazil pay the island’s Communist government millions of dollars every month to provide the medical services, effectively making the doctors Cuba’s most valuable export.

But the doctors get a small cut of that money, and a growing number of them in Brazil have begun to rebel. In the last year, at least 150 Cuban doctors have filed lawsuits in Brazilian courts to challenge the arrangement, demanding to be treated as independent contractors who earn full salaries, not agents of the Cuban state.

“When you leave Cuba for the first time, you discover many things that you had been blind to,” said Yaili Jiménez Gutierrez, one of the doctors who filed suit. “There comes a time when you get tired of being a slave.”


​Sending doctors overseas is not only a way for Cuba to earn much-needed income, but it also helps promote the nation’s image as a medical powerhouse that routinely comes to the world’s aid.
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